Writing the War Target Display

WRITING THE WAR due W 3/13

Compose your own original World War I poem. Use everything you’ve learned about life in the trenches and on the homefront to see through their eyes and place yourself in the era of World War I. Put to use all of the resources on my and Mr. Taft’s websites and all of your notes!

Write a poem from whatever World War I perspective you choose, but capture the era in your best poetic voice, figurative language, descriptive language, and imagery. Consider the poems you’ve read as models.

Write about 20 to 30 lines of poetry, either all as one longer poem or a series of shorter poems. Of course, you’re welcome to write in free verse, create a rhyme scheme, compose a specific type of poem… whatever best captures the perspective you want to explore.

Give your poem a meaningful title. Submit your work on GoogleClassroom – GoogleDocs or PDFs only.

Refer to the learning targets above. Utilize your poetry notes throughout this project.

Primary Sources to Inspire Your Poetry:

Click here for the GoogleDoc of this assignment. It’s also available on GoogleClassroom.

Catch up on Refugee!

Take a coloring page or two home tonight so you can catch up on Refugee! I’ll read tomorrow from starting where 8-2 left off, so everyone else needs to catch up!

Now we are all caught up with 8-2, and we’ll all start with Joseph in class on Tuesday. We’re in a race to finish the book this week!

WWI in Poetry

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Learning Targets — I can…

Parts I & II:

  • Identify and explain figurative language, tone, persona, and other literary or poetic devices in the poem.
  • Closely read and analyze (identify and explain) the purpose and meaning of a poem in its historical context; in other words, apply what we’re learning in History to the poem.
  • Use and cite specific words and lines from the poem to support my ideas.

Part III:

  • Accurately and creatively portray the history of World War I in my poem; readers can experience World War I in my poem.
  • Create imagery by using vivid and strong words; my word choices are varied, powerful, and precise.
  • Enhance the meaning and impact of my poem with powerful visual elements, such as backgrounds, images, font choices, colors, etc.

Reading the War:

On the “WWI in Poetry” page, read the poems and check out the related videos and links.

I> First, by yourself, directly on your poetry handouts, annotate the poems, looking for…

  • Figurative Language — What imagery, allusions, metaphors, personification, and other literary terms and devices do you see? (See Poetry Terms slides or ask questions if you need a reminder on what these are.)
  • Signposts (On the Reading page!) — What comes up again and again in a poem; what are the words of the wiser of the poem; what memory moments, aha moments, or contrasts and contradictions do you see; any word gaps for you?
  • Meaning — What do you make of the poem; what does it say to you; what do you take away from it?
  • Power Lines — What stops you in your tracks? What hits you in the heart and the head? What stands out and captures your attention? What appeals to you?

II> Second, after you’ve had a chance to read and think about the poems on your own, join up with one or two partners (no more than groups of three!). Share your thoughts on the poems with one another and add to your annotations. Note: If you are not in class to work with a partner, then discuss the poems and add to your annotations with a classmate or friend outside of class.


Writing the War:

III> Third, compose your own original World War I poem. Use everything you’ve learned about life in the trenches and on the homefront to see through their eyes and place yourself in the era of World War I. Put to use all of the resources on my Mr. Taft’s websites and all of your notes!

Write a poem from whatever World War I perspective you choose, but capture the era in your best poetic voice, figurative language, descriptive language, and imagery. Consider the poems you’ve read as models.

Write about 20 to 30 lines of poetry, either all as one longer poem or a series of shorter poems. Of course, you’re welcome to write in free verse, create a rhyme scheme, compose a specific type of poem… whatever best captures the perspective you want to explore.

Give your poem a meaningful title. Submit your work on GoogleClassroom – GoogleDocs or PDFs only.

As we have done with other poetry we’ve written this year, create an 8.5×11” (regular paper size) poster for your poem. If you compose more than one poem, you can create a poster for just one of them.

Refer to the learning targets above. Utilize your poetry notes throughout this project.

Primary Sources to Inspire Your Poetry:

Click here for the GoogleDoc of this assignment. It’s also available on GoogleClassroom.

Novels in Verse Target Display

Learning Targets ~ I can…

  • Identify and explain the overarching theme(s) of a novel in verse.
  • Make connections between and draw conclusions about fiction, history, and current events.
  • Support my ideas with evidence from the  novel in verse.
  • Communicate ideas effectively and creatively as appropriate for chosen form of target display.

Alongside our discussion of 20th century American history and literature where individuals and groups formed and shaped their own identities, we each read at least one novel in verse of our choice. Now, let’s  accomplish these goals:

  • summarize the book without giving too much away;
  • identify important themes in the book;
  • make connections to what we’ve been working on in both American Studies History and English;
  • make connections to current events;
  • draw conclusions about the book and those connections.

To accomplish these goals, you may create any type of target display you choose. Demonstrate that you can hit the learning targets for the novels in verse. Think about important themes or “Words of the Wiser” in the novel and make connections to any aspect of American Studies and current events or topics we see in the news daily. You have critical thinking and creative control.

If you’re not sure what you would like to do for this target display, please talk with Doc to brainstorm ideas. Some suggestions include but are not limited to:

  • Continue the story and its themes with additional poems, making connections to history or current events.
  • Create a piece of art that reflects the theme and the novel’s connections to history or current events.
  • Thoroughly sketchnote the novel, its themes, and connections to history or current events.
  • Create a playlist for the novel with explanation of song choices that show the novel’s themes and connections to history or current events.
  • Write a letter to the author, offering your thoughts on the novel’s themes and connections to history or current events.
  • Record a polished, professional-looking video that shares your thoughts on the novel’s themes and connections to history or current events.

Due Date: This target display is due MONDAY, MARCH 4TH for all sections.

Mon 2/4 & Tues 2/5: Women at Turn of 20th Century

YOU MAY WORK WITH A PARTNER! WORK TOGETHER; NO DIVIDE & CONQUER.

 

Emily Dickinson

Learn more about Dickinson at the Emily Dickinson Museum.

“The speakers in Dickinson’s poetry, like those in Brontë’s and Browning’s works, are sharp-sighted observers who see the inescapable limitations of their societies as well as their imagined and imaginable escapes.” ~ Poetry Foundation

Close Reading and Critical Thinking:

Using sketchnotes on the same large paper we used for our vocabulary pictures, do a line-by-line interpretation of the three Dickinson poems listed above.

  • What do these three poems mean to you, line-by-line and overall as a whole poem?
  • What do you think are important symbols or important poetic devices / literary terms in these poems? Why are they important?
  • What might these poems say about women at the turn of the 20th century? How might we interpret these poems to be about or to reflect women today?
  • Show me your best close reading and analysis skills — your Upper School level skills!

Be ready to explain your work to the class. Show us YOUR meaning of the poems.


Kate Chopin

Read “The Story of an Hour” (handed out in class). If you’d like, you can also listen to it in the video below. Learn more about the story on “The Story of an Hour” page at KateChopin.org.

Close Reading and Critical Thinking:

Directly on your story handout, annotate using the Notice and Note signposts. Look especially for Contrasts and Contradictions, and AHa Moments, and Again and Again.

CONTRASTS & CONTRADICTIONS: When a character does something that contrasts with what you’d expect or contradicts their earlier acts or statements. ASK: Why is the character doing that?

AHA MOMENT: When a character realizes, understands, or finally figures out something. ASK: How might this change things?

AGAIN & AGAIN: When a word, phrase, or situation is mentioned over and over. ASK: Why does this keep happening or coming up again and again?

In your annotations, also comment on these questions:

  • What do you notice about this story?
  • What might this story say about women at the turn of the 20th century? How might we interpret this story to be about or to reflect women today?
  • Show me your best close reading and analysis skills — your Upper School level skills!


Other To Dos:

  • NHD!
  • Novel in Verse reading