To Reflect on Mockingbird

Learning Targets:

  • Make connections between and draw conclusions about a text and the social, cultural, and political situation of the time in which it was written and published.
  • Make connections between and draw conclusions about a text and the social, cultural, and political situation of the time in which it is currently being read.
  • Use and cite specific evidence and examples to support my ideas.
  • Apply vocabulary words to my own writing, demonstrating my knowledge of the nuances in word meanings.
  • Adhere to the 8th grade American Studies writing non-negotiables. (Dr. Walczak will not read and evaluate essays that do not meet the writing non-negotiables. Your essay will simply be returned to you, and you will not receive credit for any of the learning targets.)

NOTE: Because we are so close to the end of the school year…

  1. Late work will not be accepted.
  2. You will NOT have the opportunity to reassess this work. Ensure that you hit the learning targets on the draft you submit for evaluation.

Now that you have closely read and analyzed power passages in To Kill a Mockingbird and extensively explored the Civil Rights Movement, it’s time to merge these units of study together.

Your last learning experience for To Kill a Mockingbird is to write a short essay that addresses the following questions. To practice brevity, your essay must be succinct, making a clear claim and supporting the claim with evidence in no more than two typed pages (12 pt TNR font; double-spaced). Your essay should have a clear introduction and conclusion. Each paragraph should have a distinct topic sentence and should flow into the next paragraph with a definite transition.

Questions:

  • How does To Kill a Mockingbird relate to and reflect the social, cultural, and political situation of the time in which it was written and published, meaning the Civil Rights Era? To Kill a Mockingbird has often been referred to as “the right book at the right time.” What do you think of that description? Was Mockingbird the right book to be published in 1960, awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1961, and made into an Academy Award winning film in 1962? Why or why not?
  • Why should we continue to read this novel today, well over 50 years after its publication? How does this novel relate and reflect the social, cultural, and political situation of the time in which we are currently reading it? How does it speak to us, our lives, our communities, and our country today?

Support your ideas with specific evidence and examples. If you use outside sources, be sure to create a Works Cited page in MLA format. Use NoodleTools. Use credible, unbiased sources only.

Because this is reflective writing, your voice may be more conversational and less academic. However, your writing skills, mechanics, and conventions must still be solid. See the Conventions webpage for help and be sure to ask questions!

Finally, within your essay, please use at the very minimum ten vocabulary words from this year. Please note — your vocabulary word usage needs to be seamless and successful. Use the words because they mean what you are attempting to communicate. Do not “force” words into sentences where they don’t truly work or make sense. Bold, highlight, or underline vocabulary words, please.

Submit only a GoogleDoc on GoogleClassroom. Do not submit any other format (Word, Pages, pdf, etc.)

Click here for the GoogleDoc of this learning experience.

Due: Tuesday, May 30 for ALL sections.

Vocabulary Final Exam

Every student will have American Studies English on Monday, June 5th and will take the final vocabulary exam on that day. The exam will be timed; at the end of 70 minutes, you must turn in your test, whether you are completely done or not (unless you have made necessary prior arrangements with me).

Begin studying immediately. Study progressively; review a little bit every day.

Know everything — word, part(s) of speech, definition, synonyms, antonyms, spelling, and even pronunciation. If you’re not sure about any of these things, please ask!

Please ask if you have any questions.

All word lists can be found on the Vocabulary page. Please share study tools with one another!

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Vocabulary List #5

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Here’s our penultimate vocabulary list: Vocabulary List #5

Sketchnotes are due on either Wednesday 3/8 or Thursday 3/9, depending on when you have class.

Sketchnotes Learning Targets:

  • I can creatively and effectively make a visual representation of a word, including its definition(s), part(s) of speech, synonyms, and antonyms.
  • I can use visual elements like images and icons to show that I understand the word with little to no help from textual elements such as speech bubbles.

You can find more information and resources for sketchnotes on the Vocabulary page.

Vocabulary and Voices (of the West)

Let’s begin with…

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On to Vocabulary List #4 SketchNotes.

Vocabulary List #4

SketchNotes Learning Targets

  • I can creatively and effectively make a visual representation of a word, including its definition(s), part(s) of speech, synonyms, and antonyms.
  • I can use visual elements like images and icons to show that I understand the word with little to no help from textual elements such as speech bubbles.

 

And finally, Voices of the West.

While Company Doctor Walczak is out…

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That’s Doc in the middle there.

Company Doctor Walczak will be out of town at two super-cool English teacher conferences on Friday 11/18, Monday 11/21, and Tuesday 11/22. Here are your Marching Orders.

  • Be respectful, kind, and helpful to your substitute teachers! #actlikeahufflepuff
  • Reminder — everything you need can be found on the “Peculiar Institution” page.

I. First, if you and your fellow soldiers did not complete your work on Uncle Tom’s Cabin, please do so. Submit your work on GoogleClassroom.


II. Second, begin your work on Calhoun, Truth, and Douglass. This is very serious and challenging work. Please take your time; be thoughtful and thorough. Pay very close attention to the learning targets and to all instructions. Submit your work on GoogleClassroom.


III. Should you finish your Calhoun, Truth, and Douglass assignment, continue your Collection and Creation project. Finish making your way through the “Peculiar Institution” resources that interest you. Take notes (your observations, reactions, and questions) and build your word bank. Compose your found poem from your word bank. Again, pay close attention to the learning targets and to all instructions. Double- and triple-check the rubric. Note: Please submit your poem on GoogleClassroom AND print a hard copy that you can hang on your locker.


IV. Additional orders…

  • Check the list below to make sure you are not missing work! If you are missing work, get it in!
  • Pass back assessed work from your class’s hanging file folder in the black crate.
  • Take up challenges that interest you to earn Civil War points!
  • Study Vocabulary List #3!
  • Read for fun!

If your name appears below, it means I don’t have something from you. Check your learning target progress report to see what you’re missing.

  • Jeanna A.
  • George E.
  • Karly F.
  • Mya J.
  • Ellie L.
  • Sofia L.
  • Cole S.
  • Andrew B.
  • Iren H
  • Donovan J
  • Aspyn K.
  • Nick L.
  • John W.
  • Laine B.
  • Peter E.
  • Audrey F.
  • Meredith G.
  • Sander R.
  • Anna S.
  • Curtis T.
  • Ali V.
  • Porter W.
  • Isaiah C.
  • Ava E.
  • Tuzzie R.
  • Jordan S.
  • Karan S.

 

 

ASR! Civil War Points Opportunities

For up to 500 Civil War Points

Read the entire abridged version of Uncle Tom’s Cabin online here.

Write a review of the text, write a poem or series of poems in response to the text, create a graphic novel version, or come up with another idea to demonstrate your understanding of and response to the story. Run ideas by Doc.


For up to 100 Civil War Points

Create a challenging Kahoot! for Vocabulary List #3!