Novels in Verse Target Display

Learning Targets ~ I can…

  • Identify and explain the overarching theme(s) of a novel in verse.
  • Make connections between and draw conclusions about fiction, history, and current events.
  • Support my ideas with evidence from the  novel in verse.
  • Communicate ideas effectively and creatively as appropriate for chosen form of target display.

Alongside our discussion of 20th century American history and literature where individuals and groups formed and shaped their own identities, we each read at least one novel in verse of our choice. Now, let’s  accomplish these goals:

  • summarize the book without giving too much away;
  • identify important themes in the book;
  • make connections to what we’ve been working on in both American Studies History and English;
  • make connections to current events;
  • draw conclusions about the book and those connections.

To accomplish these goals, you may create any type of target display you choose. Demonstrate that you can hit the learning targets for the novels in verse. Think about important themes or “Words of the Wiser” in the novel and make connections to any aspect of American Studies and current events or topics we see in the news daily. You have critical thinking and creative control.

If you’re not sure what you would like to do for this target display, please talk with Doc to brainstorm ideas. Some suggestions include but are not limited to:

  • Continue the story and its themes with additional poems, making connections to history or current events.
  • Create a piece of art that reflects the theme and the novel’s connections to history or current events.
  • Thoroughly sketchnote the novel, its themes, and connections to history or current events.
  • Create a playlist for the novel with explanation of song choices that show the novel’s themes and connections to history or current events.
  • Write a letter to the author, offering your thoughts on the novel’s themes and connections to history or current events.
  • Record a polished, professional-looking video that shares your thoughts on the novel’s themes and connections to history or current events.

Due Date: This target display is due MONDAY, MARCH 4TH for all sections.

Mon 2/4 & Tues 2/5: Women at Turn of 20th Century

YOU MAY WORK WITH A PARTNER! WORK TOGETHER; NO DIVIDE & CONQUER.

 

Emily Dickinson

Learn more about Dickinson at the Emily Dickinson Museum.

“The speakers in Dickinson’s poetry, like those in Brontë’s and Browning’s works, are sharp-sighted observers who see the inescapable limitations of their societies as well as their imagined and imaginable escapes.” ~ Poetry Foundation

Close Reading and Critical Thinking:

Using sketchnotes on the same large paper we used for our vocabulary pictures, do a line-by-line interpretation of the three Dickinson poems listed above.

  • What do these three poems mean to you, line-by-line and overall as a whole poem?
  • What do you think are important symbols or important poetic devices / literary terms in these poems? Why are they important?
  • What might these poems say about women at the turn of the 20th century? How might we interpret these poems to be about or to reflect women today?
  • Show me your best close reading and analysis skills — your Upper School level skills!

Be ready to explain your work to the class. Show us YOUR meaning of the poems.


Kate Chopin

Read “The Story of an Hour” (handed out in class). If you’d like, you can also listen to it in the video below. Learn more about the story on “The Story of an Hour” page at KateChopin.org.

Close Reading and Critical Thinking:

Directly on your story handout, annotate using the Notice and Note signposts. Look especially for Contrasts and Contradictions, and AHa Moments, and Again and Again.

CONTRASTS & CONTRADICTIONS: When a character does something that contrasts with what you’d expect or contradicts their earlier acts or statements. ASK: Why is the character doing that?

AHA MOMENT: When a character realizes, understands, or finally figures out something. ASK: How might this change things?

AGAIN & AGAIN: When a word, phrase, or situation is mentioned over and over. ASK: Why does this keep happening or coming up again and again?

In your annotations, also comment on these questions:

  • What do you notice about this story?
  • What might this story say about women at the turn of the 20th century? How might we interpret this story to be about or to reflect women today?
  • Show me your best close reading and analysis skills — your Upper School level skills!


Other To Dos:

  • NHD!
  • Novel in Verse reading

Hard Deadline on Friday 2/1 for everyone!

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Much Angery at Winters!

To Do for Everyone – due Friday for everyone, whether you have me for class or not.

1. Learn about the Gilded Age. Check out my Turn of the Twentieth Century: Gilded Age page and Mr. Taft’s Intro to the Gilded Age. Complete the SketchNotes assigned by Mr. Taft; we’ll use them in English, too!
2. Do a little research on reputable sources about the following women.
  • Emily Dickinson
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman
  • Kate Chopin
  • Ida B. Wells
  • Frances Harper
  • Pauline Hopkins
  • Nellie Bly
Take a few notes on loose-leaf (maybe about five bullet points for each woman) about…
  • what they did during the Turn of the Twentieth Century and/or the Gilded Age,
  • their legacy,
  • and their connection/relation to today.
3. Do some more NoRedInk. We’ll have an assessment soon.
4. Pick your Novels in Verse, make your locker poster (follow instructions on locker poster assignment sheet), and start reading!
5. Brush up on vocab lists #1-3.
6. Begin studying list #4. Do your twelve pictures on big paper – showing meaning of vocab words in pictures only without words. No speech bubbles. Do TWO pictures for “patronage” because there are two distinct, different definitions. Color in your drawings, please!
If you don’t have me for class on Friday, you are responsible for turning in your work during the day.

Awwww, yissss…snow day!

Yes, we’re home today, but we do have work to do!

1. Hang with the fam. Like, actually leave your bedroom and talk with the people you live with. They love you.

2. Learn about the Gilded Age. Check out my Turn of the Twentieth Century: Gilded Age page and Mr. Taft’s Intro to the Gilded Age. Complete the SketchNotes assigned by Mr. Taft; we’ll use them in English, too!

3. Do a little research on reputable sources about the following women.

  • Emily Dickinson
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman
  • Kate Chopin
  • Ida B. Wells
  • Frances Harper
  • Pauline Hopkins
  • Nellie Bly

Take a few notes on loose-leaf (maybe about five bullet points for each woman) about…

  • what they did during the Turn of the Twentieth Century and/or the Gilded Age,
  • their legacy,
  • and their connection/relation to today.

Use the Turn of the Twentieth Century: The Voices of Women page to start!

4. Do some more NoRedInk. We’ll have an assessment soon.

5. Pick your Novels in Verse, make your locker poster (follow instructions on locker poster assignment sheet), and start reading!

6. Brush up on vocab lists #1-3. Begin studying list #4.

 

Snow Day Homework!

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Woo hoo! To do:

1. Help shovel and/or play with your dog or younger sibling in the snow.
2. Do some NoRedInk.
3. Check out lists of Novels in Verse and choose one or two you’d like to read.
4. Brush up on vocab lists #1-3 before we add list #4.
5. Spend at least a few minutes reading for fun!

Enjoy! And keep up whatever snow day rituals you’ve been doing – white crayon in freezer, etc. – because they’re clearly working.

Novels in Verse & NoRedInk

Note: We will begin this unit in class on Tuesday 1/22 and Wednesday 1/23; you do not have any homework to do before you have class on Tuesday or Wednesday this week. Thanks!

novelsinverse

Choose more books!

Identities ~ Novels in Verse

Learning Targets ~ I can…

  • Explore a specific genre.
  • Make connections between and draw conclusions about fiction, history, and current events.
  • Identify and explain the overarching theme(s) of a novel and point to where the theme appears throughout the course of the text.

Instructions:

As we explore many points in 20th century American literature where individuals and groups formed and shaped their own identities, we will each read at least one novel in verse. If you choose a particularly short book, you will be expected to read more than one.

For this reading assignment, you must read books that you have not read before. Rereading isn’t an option.  If you have any question about whether or not a book qualifies for this assignment, please ask Doc.

As you read the novel, prepare for a final assignment that asks you to briefly summarize the book without giving too much away; identify important themes in the book; make connections to what we’ve been working on in both American Studies History and English; make connections to current events; and draw conclusions about the book and those connections.

If you finish a book quickly, then I’d love to see you go above and beyond by reading more than one!

First… Choose your book(s).

Second… Take down your current locker poster(s). Replace it with a new one! See the assignment sheet for your new poster here.

Third… Read your book(s), and we’ll take it from there!

Resources:


Identities ~ Novels in Verse Locker Poster

Learning Targets ~ I can…

  • Write a brief description of a book that sparks interest in it without giving too much of it away.
  • Meet the expectations of the 8th grade Writing Specs. (Remember, book titles are italicized!).
  • Create a visually appealing and easily understandable poster with creative and artistic elements, such as backgrounds, images, font choices, colors, and so on.

As with your Summer Reading Book Recommendation Ad and your Dystopian Literature Locker Poster, think of this project as creating an ad for the book; “sell” it to other students who might be looking for a new dystopian book to read. Your poster should be interesting, intriguing, and captivating – something that grabs people’s attention and encourages them to check out your poster and, in turn, the book.

Please be creative and utilize your best writing, design, art, and technology knowledge and skills. Your poster should be eye-catching, appealing, and professional-looking. It should also be easy to read and understand. Posters will hang on our lockers. Keep that in mind when designing yours.

Please write a very brief description of the book in your own words. Do not simply copy the information from the cover, Amazon, GoodReads, or other sources.

Include the following:

  • Title (italicized) and author of the book.
  • Very brief description of the book (see cover, Amazon, etc. – but put into your own words, please). If it’s a book in a series, you could also give a brief description of the series.
  • Your name and AS English section.

Requirements:

  • 8.5×11” paper (regular paper size).
  • Extremely neat, appealing, and professional presentation.
  • Images and text.
  • In color.
  • No spelling or grammar/mechanics errors.

Print out a hard copy of your poster to hang on your locker. Save your poster as a pdf file and submit it on GoogleClassroom. I will evaluate your posters in GoogleClassroom, so be sure to submit it there!


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