A new reading assignment!

From WWII On: Historical Fiction/Nonfiction

By popular demand! On the 4th Quarter Reading Reflections, many of you asked for another opportunity to choose your own novel to read. We can do that!

Learning Targets ~ I can…

  • Explore a specific genre or topic.
  • Make connections between and draw conclusions about fiction, history, and current events.
  • Identify and explain the overarching theme(s) of a text and point to where the theme appears throughout the course of the text.

Instructions:

Now that we’re in the last part of the school year, we will turn to more recent times in America’s story. Choose a historical fiction or nonfiction book that explores American stories from World War II on to the present. You have tremendous freedom to choose the time period, topic, or aspect of America’s story for this project. Choose what interests you, what you want to learn more about, what you want to read about.

Now that we’re in the last part of the school year, we will turn to more recent times in America’s story. Choose a historical fiction or nonfiction book that explores American stories from World War II on to the present. You have tremendous freedom to choose the time period, topic, or aspect of America’s story for this project. Choose what interests you, what you want to learn more about, what you want to read about.

For this reading assignment, you must read books that you have not read before. Rereading isn’t an option.  If you have any question about whether or not a book qualifies for this assignment, please ask Doc.

As you read the novel or nonfiction book, prepare for a final assignment that asks you to briefly summarize the book without giving too much away; identify important themes in the book; make connections to what we’ve been working on in both American Studies History and English; make connections to current events; and draw conclusions about the book and those connections.

If you read novels in verse or graphic novels, you must read at least two, depending on length. If they’re short, you must read three.

If you finish a book quickly, then I’d love to see you go above and beyond by reading more than one!

CHOOSE YOUR BOOK AND CREATE YOUR LOCKER POSTER BY THURSDAY 4/18! You can purchase books, check them out from Mrs. E. or your local library, or borrow books from Mr. Taft and me. Remember, hang a hard copy of your poster on your locker and submit it to GoogleClassroom.

First…Choose your book(s).

Second…Take down your current locker poster(s). Replace it with a new one! See the assignment sheet for your new poster here.

Third…Read your book(s), and we’ll take it from there!

Resources:

GoogleDoc assignment sheets also available on GoogleClassroom.

Vocabulary Sentences

Once you have drawn pictures for each of the vocabulary words from Lists #5 and #6, I’d like you to write sentences for these words. Please handwrite neatly on loose-leaf paper. (Typing not an option unless you have special dispensation to do so.) There are 23 words total.

Learning Targets ~ I can…

  • Apply the vocabulary words in my own writing, showing that I know what the word means and how to use it correctly and properly.
  • Write clearly and effectively, meeting the expectations of the Writing Specs for 8th grade. PROOFREAD, PLEASE!

For each of the words in both Lists #5 and #6:

  1. Give the part(s) of speech for the word as it appears in the list. If a word can be more than one part of speech, please list all of them.
  2. Write a sentence for each of the words. Sentences must demonstrate clearly that you know what the word means and how to use it correctly. Sentences must also be free of spelling, grammar, and writing mechanics errors. You may change the form or the tense of a vocabulary word, but you must still spell it correctly. Please UNDERLINE, HIGHLIGHT, or CIRCLE the word in the sentence.

Notes:

  • You may use more than one vocabulary word in a sentence.
  • You may write completely separate, unconnected sentences, or you can write a story of related sentences.

Due for ALL sections by Wednesday 4/17, even if you don’t see me in class that day – please turn it in on Tuesday 4/16 if necessary.

More Vocabulary!

You’ve completed your pictures for List #5. Let’s move on to pictures for every term in List #6! Show the meaning in pictures, without using words. No speech bubbles – show the meaning through the image.

Due: Thursday 4/11 for Sections 1, 5, 7 and Friday 4/12 for Sections 2 and 6.

Don’t forget! We have a comprehensive final exam at the end of the year! (Hint, hint!)

Federal Writers’ Project Found Poetry

American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936 to 1940

Works Project Administration Federal Writers’ Project @ LoC

Search by Subjects

Examples of Subjects:

“This collection of life histories consists of approximately 2,900 documents, compiled and transcribed by more than 300 writers from 24 states, working on the Folklore Project of the Federal Writers’ Project, a New Deal jobs program that was part of the U.S. Works Progress (later Work Projects) Administration (WPA) from 1936 to 1940. Typically 2,000-15,000 words in length, the documents vary in form from narratives to dialogues to reports to case histories. They chronicle vivid life stories of Americans who lived at the turn of the century and include tales of meeting Billy the Kid, surviving the 1871 Chicago fire, pioneer journeys out West, grueling factory work, and the immigrant experience.”

Turn just one of these amazing life stories into a found poem.

Targets — I can…

  • Communicate a clear purpose or theme in my poem; readers can understand and appreciate my poem.
  • Create an impact with my poem; readers experience the desired reaction or emotional response.
  • Use language from the original sources effectively and creatively; I go beyond the obvious or predictable.
  • Create imagery by using vivid and strong words; my word choices are varied, powerful, and precise.

As you know from past projects, a found poem is the “literary equivalent of a collage” (poets.org). “Found poems take existing texts and refashion them, reorder them, and present them as poems” (poets.org). “A pure found poem consists exclusively of outside texts: the words of the poem remain as they were found, with few additions or omissions. Decisions of form, such as where to break a line, are left to the poet” (poets.org).

Create about 20 lines of found poetry from one of the life histories collected by the Federal Writers’ Project during the Great Depression. Read aloud as you arrange. Arrange the words so they make a rhythm you like. Space them any way you want. Shape them poem however you like. Your job is to arrange the language you found so as to re-create it into something new, something yours.

Reflect the stories of America collected and chronicled during the Great Depression. Make the experiences of those who shared their stories with the Federal Writers’ Project during the Great Depression come to life again in your work.

As you refine and polish your poems, you may add a minor word or two if you need to, but only a word or two. You may also make other minor changes, for example tenses, possessive, plurals, punctuations, and capitalizations.

Print out and turn in a hard copy of your poem.

It’s the 1920s around here!

Here’s the list of assigned poems and roles!

Tuesday and Wednesday: Harlem Renaissance Poetry Slam ~ Come prepared to wow us with your poem performance. Here’s the assignment sheet.

Thursday: A Social Gathering of 1920s Luminaries ~ Come in character. Here’s the assignment sheet.

Print out a hard copy of your first-person biography to bring with you to the Social Gathering of Luminaries on Thursday! (Print BEFORE the party begins!)

Please carefully read and follow all instructions. Please double- and triple-check all directions and learning targets.

Finish Refugee

Not everyone heard pages 270-84. If you did not, start there!

Joseph pp 285-91

Isabel pp 292-98

Mahmoud pp 299-305

Isabel and Mahmoud pp 306-15 Part I

I didn’t get a chance to record Part II – go to the file above, download it, and read the very last couple of pages! Eeek!