Mon 2/4 & Tues 2/5: Women at Turn of 20th Century

YOU MAY WORK WITH A PARTNER! WORK TOGETHER; NO DIVIDE & CONQUER.

 

Emily Dickinson

Learn more about Dickinson at the Emily Dickinson Museum.

“The speakers in Dickinson’s poetry, like those in Brontë’s and Browning’s works, are sharp-sighted observers who see the inescapable limitations of their societies as well as their imagined and imaginable escapes.” ~ Poetry Foundation

Close Reading and Critical Thinking:

Using sketchnotes on the same large paper we used for our vocabulary pictures, do a line-by-line interpretation of the three Dickinson poems listed above.

  • What do these three poems mean to you, line-by-line and overall as a whole poem?
  • What do you think are important symbols or important poetic devices / literary terms in these poems? Why are they important?
  • What might these poems say about women at the turn of the 20th century? How might we interpret these poems to be about or to reflect women today?
  • Show me your best close reading and analysis skills — your Upper School level skills!

Be ready to explain your work to the class. Show us YOUR meaning of the poems.


Kate Chopin

Read “The Story of an Hour” (handed out in class). If you’d like, you can also listen to it in the video below. Learn more about the story on “The Story of an Hour” page at KateChopin.org.

Close Reading and Critical Thinking:

Directly on your story handout, annotate using the Notice and Note signposts. Look especially for Contrasts and Contradictions, and AHa Moments, and Again and Again.

CONTRASTS & CONTRADICTIONS: When a character does something that contrasts with what you’d expect or contradicts their earlier acts or statements. ASK: Why is the character doing that?

AHA MOMENT: When a character realizes, understands, or finally figures out something. ASK: How might this change things?

AGAIN & AGAIN: When a word, phrase, or situation is mentioned over and over. ASK: Why does this keep happening or coming up again and again?

In your annotations, also comment on these questions:

  • What do you notice about this story?
  • What might this story say about women at the turn of the 20th century? How might we interpret this story to be about or to reflect women today?
  • Show me your best close reading and analysis skills — your Upper School level skills!


Other To Dos:

  • NHD!
  • Novel in Verse reading