Cities & Immigration…

…at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

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It’s a snow day… so you can explore cities and immigration at the turn of the 20th century from the warmth of your own bedrooms!

Please check out the resources below and read and annotate the texts via GoogleDocs on GoogleClassroom. Students in sections 2 and 6, you can work with a partner or group of three with anyone in sections 2 or 6; make sure everyone contributes to one document and include everyone’s names. This work is due on Tuesday for sections 2 and 6.

Students who had class yesterday in sections 1, 5 and 7, you’re finishing up with whomever you worked with yesterday as homework for Monday.

Show what you think the texts mean; look up words, phrases, allusions you don’t know. Last week, you did an awesome job closely reading and analyzing Emily Dickinson’s poems — do the same with these!

Take your time, give your full effort, and show me your ready-to-move-on-to-Upper-School skills.

If you do not finish in class, this is homework for Monday/Tuesday. If you have extra time, dive back into To Kill a Mockingbird.

Even though we had a snow day today, next week is still busy with assessments:

  • Monday/Tuesday – American Studies joint assessment on the turn of the 20th Century Gilded Age and Progressive Era.
  • Wednesday/Thursday – Vocabulary assessment on Lists #1, 2, and 3. While the assessment will focus on List #3, words from the first two lists can always make a comeback!

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

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Click here for an introduction to Upton Sinclair and The Jungle.

Read a brief excerpt from The Jungle.

Revisiting ‘The Jungle’ in modern times

7 Things You May Not Know About “The Jungle”


Carl Sandburg

“Chicago”

“I Am the People, the Mob”


Emma Lazarus

“The New Colossus”

Interactive New Colossus

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